The Secret of the Old Clock/The Hidden Staircase/The Bungalow Mystery/The Mystery at Lilac Inn/The Secret of Shadow Ranch/The Secret of Red Gate Farm (Nancy Drew, Book 1-6)

The Secret of the Old Clock/The Hidden Staircase/The Bungalow Mystery/The Mystery at Lilac Inn/The Secret of Shadow Ranch/The Secret of Red Gate Farm (Nancy Drew, Book 1-6)Rating: Rated 4.5 stars (39 reviews) Author: Carolyn Keene Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap Every girl in America can benefit from reading Nancy Drew mysteries. Unlike a lot of books out there today that are questionable for young girls or have promiscuous elements, Nancy Drew is wholesome fun. This starter set is an excellent value for anyone who would like to introduce a girl to Nancy Drew. The Secret of the Old Clock is the first book in the series, and it does a nice job of introducing the character and giving us a glimpse into her adventurous spirit. The second book, Hidden Staircase, is perhaps my favorite Nancy Drew book of all time as it has all the great elements of a mystery, complete with a creepy old mansion. Nancy started solving mysteries back in 1929 when she was 16. Within a few years, she had turned 18, the age at which she would remain for the duration of the series. But Nancy was a mature 18, very smart, self-possessed, shrewd, and unafraid. And I like that about her. Nancy was definitely middle class (probably more like upper middle class), living in a big brick home set back from the road in the swanky part of River Heights, state unknown. She lived with her dad, Carson Drew, a prominent attorney, and Hannah, their housekeeper. That middle class stability gave Nancy the freedom she needed to do her own thing. And she took full advantage of it. She had her own blue convertible roadster, which was probably a big deal back in the 1930s for a girl her age. She had her own money, but no paying job; a credit card; and lots of opportunities most folks can only dream of, such as flying lessons and trips around the world (which she invited her friends along to boot). She also had a boyfriend, Ned Nickerson, who was a popular football player at Emerson University, state unknown. There was no funny business between Nancy and Ned. Instead, Nancy called on him when she needed his brawn, a lookout or perhaps a ride after escaping from a moss-covered mansion. And Ned was always quick to oblige. He didn’t begrudge her the adventure and excitement. Maybe he was ahead of his time too. Each Nancy Drew book generally finds Nancy working on two seemingly unrelated mysteries, only to discover that the two are very much connected. Whether it’s in a haunted castle or at a dude ranch, Nancy’s primary goal is to help out the innocent, bring missing family members back together, recover a priceless treasure for someone on the skids and/or reveal the true identity of an impostor or villain. She is a beneficial presence. Nancy’s friends, family and hobbies were her life. She helped people, hung out with her friends and spent time with Ned when it suited her. Although wise beyond her years, Nancy did turn to her father for advice now and then, but he was smart enough not to cramp her style. Nancy is a strong, positive role model for young girls. Buy from Amazon.com

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